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Author Topic: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living  (Read 51391 times)

Offline jayme

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #60 on: February 22, 2007, 08:17:41 PM »
Something comes from upstate.  Smartwater?

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Offline megc

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #61 on: February 22, 2007, 09:13:26 PM »
Vitamin Water is from Whitestone, I believe.

Offline lanseaux

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #62 on: February 23, 2007, 01:53:55 AM »
Vitamin Water is from Whitestone, I believe.

Their building is just about a block away from the NY Times printing plant right next to the Whitestone Expressway, but I doubt that's where the water's from.  Of course, if it is, that means you're paying way too much for either NYC tap water or water from Flushing Bay.

Offline C-J

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #63 on: February 23, 2007, 12:00:16 PM »
Anyone happen to know where I can get a filtered water bottle?  Brita made one many years ago but quit carrying it.  A regular Nalgene bottle would work fine when filling it at home but I dont' trust our so called "filtered water" at the office to believe that it would actually be healthy to drink.  I've looked on Amazon and Google but didn't find anything I really liked so was wondering if there was a store that someone knew of that carried them.

Thanks for any advice!

Offline Melee

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #64 on: February 23, 2007, 01:16:42 PM »
Cjford - I know what you're talking about as I remember them too - and went looking a few months ago for one for the same reason. No luck. If you have any, do let me know. I've made do with a home water filter (its not that I don't trust NY tap water, which is some of the best in the world, but I don't trust the pipes in my building) and a Sigg aluminum lined bottle, which is super-lightweight, holds a fair bit, and I don't stress about plastic compounds making it into my water via the bottles (another possible problem with disposable plastic bottles and perhaps even Nalgenes).


Offline megc

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #65 on: February 24, 2007, 07:02:54 PM »
For those interested in thrifting/swapping (clothes and stuff):

Dj Shakey presents:

Thrift On!

The world famous clothing swap party. Bring in your old clothes and stuff to donate to our rummage tables. Take home items free from our piles of booty. Free raffle of previously owned prizes. Contests, comedy, and mayhem too. DJ Shakey and Man "S" spin second-hand records and amuse you. The more you party, the more you save.

Botanica Bar
47 East Houston Street, between Mott and Mulberry, Manhattan
Monday 2/26, 9p-1a; $free
212 343 7251
http://www.djshakey.com/thrifton

Offline jayme

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #66 on: February 26, 2007, 12:44:10 PM »
Clothes (organic, recycled, sustainable):

Domino has a green clothing "guide" (more slideshow up):
http://www.dominomag.com/galleries/2007/02/greenclothing


H&M is going to begin to carry organic cotton in summer.  Lost that link though.  I'll be curious to find out of this is sustainable organic or just organic.  I am somewhat skeptical.


Sweetskins is an Oregon based shop with hemp/recycled stuff I love:
http://sweetskins.com/http://sweetskins.com/


Paints/chemicals:

http://www.bioshieldpaint.com/ -- low/no VOC

Benjamin Moore also carries low VOC
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Offline Alexa

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #67 on: February 26, 2007, 08:38:28 PM »
GRowing up, I remember my grandfather obsessed with lights being turned on and off. He claimed that you are better off leaving the lights on for a longer period of time rather than turning it on and off every time you enter a room, that more energy is used to turn the light on than you would use if you just left it on. He was more concerned with the money spent than energy conservation but I wasn't able to find information if this was valid or not....anyone know?
When I'm about to do something, I ask myself "would an idiot do that" and if the answer is yes, I do not do that thing.

Offline jayme

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #68 on: February 26, 2007, 10:13:04 PM »
The magic of google offers this:

http://hes.lbl.gov/hes/myths.html

Quote
Leaving lights, computers, and other appliances on uses less energy than turning them off and makes them last longer.
    The small surge of power created when some devices are turned on is vastly smaller than the energy used by running the device when it's not needed. While it used to be the case that cycling appliances and lighting on and off drastically reduced their useful lifetimes, these problems have been largely overcome through better design.

So he could have been right then but wrong now.

Modified to include this as well -- math on old school flourescents:

http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0NTQ/is_2005_August_3/ai_n14922456

Quote
Leaving lights on all the time uses less energy than turning them on and off when they're used. Not true. Both incandescents and fluorescents use more energy left on all the time than they do turned on and off as needed. Some argue this can't be true, at least for fluorescents, because they draw an initial current five times greater than the operating current. But the starting surge of a rapid-start lamp lasts only 1/120th of a second. If you turn the lamp off for only a few seconds you'll still save more energy that it takes to start the lamp again. An energy study by the University of Oregon says that many people developed the habit of leaving lights on when fluorescents first came into use in the 1950s. But modern fluorescents are more durable and efficient than they were then, and save energy long term even though on-off cycling does take a toll. It seems unlikely, but here's the math. A standard rapid-start fluorescent left on all the time burns for 38,000 hours or about 4.3 years. Limited by on-off switching to 12 hours a day it will burn for only 30,000 hours. That makes switching seem counterproductive. But the lamp burning only 12 hours a day will remain in service for 6.8 years. So in this example you cut operating energy consumption in half and reduce lamp replacement costs by 30 percent. Without all the math, just bear in mind that turning off lights always saves energy. You'll save even more changing to compact fluorescents, which are three to four times more efficient than incandescents and last about ten times as long.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2007, 10:19:44 PM by jayme »
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Offline Alexa

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #69 on: February 26, 2007, 11:07:53 PM »
Okay jayme, you caught me...I didn't extensively research it. I appreciate it that you did. I was more looking if someone had some quick on-hand info. Thanks.
When I'm about to do something, I ask myself "would an idiot do that" and if the answer is yes, I do not do that thing.

Offline jayme

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #70 on: February 26, 2007, 11:50:21 PM »
ah no, I wasn't pointing out google to say you could have done it yourself -- I just didn't know the answer either :)

I've always heard it but preferred the turn the lights off method.  I do usually leave the computer on though and there is some debate there.  If the laptop plug is plugged into the wall and the laptop -- and the laptop battery is charged -- does the plug continue to pull electricity?  Should I have it on a surge and shut off the power to the plug?

I wonder...

I need some math like the flourescent light math on laptop power!
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Offline enigmacat

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #71 on: February 27, 2007, 01:04:18 PM »
Major corporations are beginning to address climate change. I haven't gotten to read this thoroughly yet but it looks very interesting!

http://makower.typepad.com/joel_makower/2007/02/the_corporate_c.html

Offline Leezichka1

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #72 on: March 08, 2007, 11:45:40 AM »
Hi All-
My friend and I just started a website about living sustainably in New York.  Here's a link to the Spring issue....check it out and let me know what you think (by email probably, since I don't want to take this thread off topic).

http://figmagazine.com/spring07/index.html

Thanks,

Leezichka

Offline jayme

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #73 on: March 14, 2007, 07:53:00 AM »
These are pigs.
See francis's friends for kitties.

Offline kbred

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #74 on: March 14, 2007, 08:26:41 AM »
There's a voluntary simplicity movement going on now. Some of them are a bit extreme, but there is a group that meets in the city on the second thursday of every month. It's more of a support group for how to live simply. Let me know if you want the info for it.


 

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