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Author Topic: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living  (Read 51214 times)

angelynyc

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #165 on: November 05, 2008, 06:41:38 AM »
Any astorians using solar power on their homes? I want to. Nothing like living on the top floor to drive home the sun's point on its awesome power.

Solar power is an excellent way to use already existing natural resources. I thought about installing solar panels on the roof of my home, I don't have the surface area to do the whole house - may a fraction of it, which I think is probably the case for most of use in Astoria.

Also, if the solar panels are easily accessible, they will be prone to theft.

Offline NYCMacUser

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #166 on: November 05, 2008, 07:00:21 AM »
A dimmer switch will consume the same amount of energy regardless of the brightness level set by the switch.
Huh? A 100 watt bulb burning at 50% will only be using 50 watts.

BEFORE I installed dimmer switches on all the lighting in my home, I had ConEd and my licensed electrician do a walk through, together, in order to do a review of both the wiring and the electric outlets. These were the professionals who agreed that dimmer switches would reduce the amount of electricity that I use since I have a vision problem that precludes the use of florescent lighting, and yet would still allow my home to be sufficiently brightly lit for guests to feel comfortable as I live in rather dim lighting conditions when I am alone in the house.
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Offline Sweeper

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #167 on: November 05, 2008, 07:12:04 AM »
Huh? A 100 watt bulb burning at 50% will only be using 50 watts.

BEFORE I installed dimmer switches on all the lighting in my home, I had ConEd and my licensed electrician do a walk through, together, in order to do a review of both the wiring and the electric outlets. These were the professionals who agreed that dimmer switches would reduce the amount of electricity that I use since I have a vision problem that precludes the use of florescent lighting, and yet would still allow my home to be sufficiently brightly lit for guests to feel comfortable as I live in rather dim lighting conditions when I am alone in the house.

It depends on the dimmer switch. Old switches use a variable resistor which consumes energy. A 100 Watt bulb consuming 50 Watts would mean the variable resistor would also consume 50 Watts. Newer models are more energy efficient but also do consume energy.

angelynyc

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #168 on: November 05, 2008, 10:05:35 AM »
Huh? A 100 watt bulb burning at 50% will only be using 50 watts.

BEFORE I installed dimmer switches on all the lighting in my home, I had ConEd and my licensed electrician do a walk through, together, in order to do a review of both the wiring and the electric outlets. These were the professionals who agreed that dimmer switches would reduce the amount of electricity that I use since I have a vision problem that precludes the use of florescent lighting, and yet would still allow my home to be sufficiently brightly lit for guests to feel comfortable as I live in rather dim lighting conditions when I am alone in the house.

I should clarify - if you go with a high quality dimmer switch, with a triac type, chances are you will be saving some energy.
Less expensive ones will have a rehostat. Difference being, without getting into all the physics:
the newer type will regulate how many times the light will turn on and off every second. Since this happens very quickly it is very hard to notice this.  This is why fluorescent lights have problems with dimmer switches, even the ones that are labeled "dimmer capable" (you can get better results if you run them for a few minutues to heat up the bulb).

The older type control the brightness and the excess electricity is given off as heat.  If you come across an older dimmer, touch it or try to touch the screws that hold it to the wall, since heat will transfer better on the metal than on the plastic - you will feel that it is quite warm on the lower settings.

hope this helps.

Offline lanseaux

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #169 on: November 05, 2008, 02:51:06 PM »
A dimmer switch will consume the same amount of energy regardless of the brightness level set by the switch.

That used to be the case, but dimmer switches are more efficient now.

ElizaJ

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #170 on: January 23, 2009, 04:55:48 PM »
It's great to be self-aware in regards to one's impact on the environment.  I have a bajillion plastic bags and since the CSA has ended for the year, no where that I know of to give them to.

Any ideas for stores in the Astoria area that take plastic bags to recycle them, and they actually do it?


Offline C-J

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #171 on: January 23, 2009, 05:25:38 PM »
I think the Major grocery stores are now collecting them.   I'm pretty sure that Key Food at Ditmars and Best Yet on 20th Ave both have collection containers.

ElizaJ

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #172 on: January 26, 2009, 04:46:50 PM »
Thanks C-J, I'll check out the Key Foods at 30th and see if they take bags.

Offline daisy

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #173 on: January 26, 2009, 05:35:55 PM »
All grocery stores are supposed to accept them.  Key Food at Ditmars def has a container, and I use it regularily.  And they take all plastic bags, not just key food bags.

Offline marija_jane

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #174 on: February 26, 2009, 12:11:42 PM »
This is sort of an ad as well as a request--

Someone above mentioned knowing the origins of things that you buy and I completely agree.  I used to be a union organizer and since I had my first child now work from home operating an online business selling organic baby clothing, cloth diapers, and specialty products for a very green practice of "diaper free baby".  I disclose where every product is made and only sell fair trade or made in USA, Australia, Europe, Japan.  Many of my products are sewn by moms working from their own homes.  (Did you know the typical American baby contributes over a cubic TON of disposable plastic diapers to landfills, that will take over 500 years to decompose?)  My site is www.ecwear.com and by appointment in Astoria.

My request and RECYCLING OPPORTUNITY is that I reuse mailing envelopes and would love to have your used envelopes.  Tyvek, paper (manilla), poly/plastic, especially without bubble lining but even with okay-- anything over 6x8 inches.  Priority Mail packaging okay.  I will remove or failing that, completely obliterate your address for privacy.    I don't need boxes though, all the baby clothes are small! 

If you have a lot, I will come to pick them up... I am also thinking of asking my CSA if they would be willing to be a central drop off location...
Thanks!

Offline wasabisam

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #175 on: July 14, 2009, 09:45:02 PM »
Am wondering if anyone knows of an online community/forum similar to this one, except focused entirely on sustainable/green lifestyles? I'm seeing quite a few, but so far I haven't found anything that seems to be very active. Ideally I'd like to find one where there is a lot of activity so that my questions are quickly answered and good discussions can get going pretty quickly.
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Offline megc

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #176 on: July 14, 2009, 09:58:24 PM »

Offline wasabisam

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #177 on: July 14, 2009, 10:11:32 PM »
Yeah I saw that one, but it didn't seem to have enough variety of boards. Of course, maybe I just didn't look through it hard enough. I'll take a look again.
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Offline Lin

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #178 on: November 15, 2009, 12:19:14 AM »
Most Rite Aid stores have a bin right next to the exit door to put plastic bags into for recycling, that's where I always take mine. When I can though, which is probably 90% of the time, I use cloth bags for shopping. I also have a habit of re-using zip lock bags. I buy the really good quality ones and just wash them out, and use them over and over again. My boyfriend thinks I am a bit nuts for doing it, but i'd say it's probably been about 6-8 months since I have had to buy a new box of zip lock bags lol...  :lol:

Also, does anyone know of a place in Astoria to take used batteries to be recycled? I have a huge bag of used AA batteries I need to take in, but I am trying to find a place closer to my apartment to take them.  :-P

Offline DancNspin

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Re: Ethical Consumerism and Green Living
« Reply #179 on: November 15, 2009, 01:19:59 PM »
Right on Lin!  I do the same thing and it saves a lot of money!  Some people think it's weird, but unless you have something particularly greasy or pungent, it works just fine.  Though I am a huge advocate for tupperware and reusable containers for things like sandwiches that you might use every day.  I have the wrap-n-mat (http://www.reusablebags.com/store/wrapnmat®-p-2.html) and I love it. 

Personally, I use my plastic bags as garbage bags since I don't have a whole lot of household garbage.  If I didn't re-use them, I would definitely be using my own tote bags for shopping.  This bag is a really good bag that is super strong, made of recycled water bottles, and has shoulder/tote straps.  I have them in a few colors and buy them as gifts too. http://www.reusablebags.com/store/acme-bags™-ultracompact-tote-circle-recycled-fabric-p-1574.html   I also think there's a huge need for produce bags that are reusable. Since the plastic ones tend to be flimsy and don't have handles there are so many that get thrown out!  http://www.reusablebags.com/store/smartcycle-recycled-produce-medium-p-1639.html I have bags like these and I love them. 


 

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