relax

Author Topic: Assembly Days in the Auditorium at P. S. 70  (Read 827 times)

Offline Delivery Boy

  • Tourist
  • *
  • Posts: 8
Assembly Days in the Auditorium at P. S. 70
« on: August 09, 2017, 01:06:03 PM »
We used to have specific days when a School Assembly would be scheduled in the theater like Auditorium at P. S. 70 on 42nd Street between Grand Avenue and Newtown Road.  There were a center aisle and two outside, left and right aisles and a downward slanted floor from the entrances in the rear down to the Stage with a piano riser and short staircases on each side.  The stage had multiple sets of heavy draw drapes and a movie screen plus multiple rear entrances to the rest of the building.  There were long, tall windows along the sides of the Auditorium which also had heavy draw drape which could be closed for movies.  The windows could be, and were, opened by teachers using a very long pole with a hook on the end.  The programs would start after all the students and teachers had entered and had been seated.  The Assembly would start with the presentation of colors by the Color Guard; whom would march down the center aisle led by the American Flag Bearer, then the State Flag Bearer and finally the New York City Flag Bearer and the remainder of the Color Guard; boys in white shirts and trousers with white ties and white gloves, girls in "Middie Blouses", with black neckerchiefs, black skirts and white gloves.  The Flag Bearers in addition to their white outfits also wore diagonal sashes from shoulder to hip with the appropriate three colors of the national anthem or the state or city flag.  It was a grand procession.

Offline Starwind51

  • Governor
  • ***********
  • Posts: 3352
  • Gender: Female
Re: Assembly Days in the Auditorium at P. S. 70
« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2017, 12:04:10 AM »
Your memory really is remarkable.  If you asked me about school assemblies I would be like "Uh... they happened...".  The layout and furnishing of your auditorium are similar to most schools I went to, but I wonder if they would sound similar to kids of today?  I'm guessing as the years went by the schools would have found the heavy drapes too expensive to maintain, but I wonder how the schools darken the auditoriums now?  Maybe they never do get dark anymore.  A lot of schools had to start using the auditoriums as classrooms, with multiple teachers holding simultaneous classes, because the educational system didn't keep pace with increased population in building new schools.  They held simultaneous classes in the lunchrooms.  They've had classes on the stairs, in the bathrooms, they've taken away playgrounds and parking lots and put temporary classroom structures out there.  It's getting better, but teachers had to alert the news media to get the changes made.


I do remember some of the assemblies, but what comes to mind first is that they would stop a movie in the middle, or even near the end, just because "time's up!".  Why bother running the thing when they knew they didn't have enough time?


At the time, being in a class play was an aggravating experience for me, but now I think how wonderful it was.  How many times in life do most of us have the opportunity to be on stage in front of so many people?


I don't know if anyone's mentioned the Forgotten New York website to you, but have a look.


http://forgotten-ny.com/




   

Offline Delivery Boy

  • Tourist
  • *
  • Posts: 8
Re: Assembly Days in the Auditorium at P. S. 70
« Reply #2 on: August 11, 2017, 08:53:39 AM »
In those early days the New York City Public School System might have been the hallmark, the benchmark, and possibly the finest education available anywhere in the world.  That in and of itself might have been the cause of its downfall.  A good education has always been what separated the classes and the masses.  The thought being; exclusivity only exists when one has superior finances, power, influence or education.  A good education can provide anyone capable of acquiring and utilizing it the ability to acquire all the rest with that education.  However, if that ability is provided to everyone without the filter of socieo-economic advantage; your son or daughter would have the same opportunities as those whom have their, "privileged", offspring trying to succeed and prosper.  This would effectively eliminate the vaunted exclusivity of money and power.  Therein is the greed syndrome that rules the world; what is the point of wealth and power if if it does not provide you and yours with more, and better, of whatever the average Joe has?  If a good education is provided free in Astoria; what is to keep those acquiring it from moving up to Forest Hills, Kew Gardens or even The Hamptons?


This is obviously to some degree facetious, however, it is also to some degree reasonably true.


 

Visit our sister site Jackson Heights Life