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Author Topic: Accuracy of "A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints"?  (Read 5921 times)

Offline 28Grand

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Re: Accuracy of "A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints"?
« Reply #15 on: July 24, 2013, 09:29:44 AM »

If the A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints doesn’t match your memory of Astoria in the 80s it’s because Dito was portraying his memory and experiences, not yours.

You’re entitled not to like the movie (or the book) for whatever reasons. But I don’t see the point in criticizing either as inaccurate because both are memoirs, not a historical pieces of nonfiction minutely researched and footnoted.

Though I wasn’t friends with Dito, we did have overlapping social circles and knew/know people in common, some of whom are depicted in the movie. I would say Dito captured the essence of those people and what it was like living here at that time for some, including me. I really liked it.

The neighbourhood may have been shown to be a little more grittier in the movie then it actually was, but I find no fault with this because my story of Astoria is very much different than Dito’s or anyone else’s.


Offline nyhardcore

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Re: Accuracy of "A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints"?
« Reply #16 on: July 24, 2013, 09:36:41 PM »
lol, this threads too funny! i was also born and raised here. i also know dito, the ruggierio bros. the stories in the movie/book to place over a few years not one summer, but the movie was a little weak!, it did bring back memories like hoping the fence to astoria pool at night, keg parties on shore blvd. The movie took place in astoria mid 80's. and it wasn't all that bad ,mostly graffiti crews ( TIK, TSS, OG TRK,etc...) than gangs,(the only one I can remember was Zoo Crew which was before my time), astoriabot summed it up, thats the way it was. but for some reason every halloween we where always getting into riot with the kids from the acropolis , :laugh: . Car break where rampant ,almost every car had a benzi box! if you had a german car it got broken into! even if it didn't have a radio. and not to mention the usual cast of crackheads (not to name names but if you where a teenager in the 80's you knew who they where). I miss those days! thats when NYC was fun.




Offline James Maxx

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Re: Accuracy of "A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints"?
« Reply #17 on: July 26, 2013, 03:39:12 PM »
As a local, born and raised in Astoria I can say it was pretty much safe and like most have said it depends who you hang out with.  There were pockets of shady areas and thugs like the park at Astoria Blvd., the low-income housing buildings near there, the Acropolis (before they went condo) and the worst areas were by Astoria Park and anything past Broadway (still a seedy area lots of low lives hence no condos ever get built there).  Car theft and grafitti was common.


I used to be outside playing with local friends and walked home from school daily.  Not so bad.
The movie did a decent portrayal of Astoria at the time.  I don't think it made it look so bad just some kids doing stupid things getting into fights etc.

Offline dito

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Re: Accuracy of "A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints"?
« Reply #18 on: December 18, 2016, 02:56:51 PM »
i was pointed here by a friend. I loved and always will love the neighborhood I grew up in. In all reality, the violence was watered DOWN a lot. Not the entire neighborhood. For the most part, it was an incredible place to grow up in. As it says in the opening monologue. Of course, everyone is entitled to an opinion wether they liked it or not. But if you knew the friends (the movie connected about 9 kids into 4) but if you knew them, us, you would know there was unfortunately a lot more horrific stories of violence mixed in. The hope was not to glorify the violence but to show what it felt like to be a kid, not as tough, as the ones I knew, but a lot luckier. To put all the violence the small circle of us were engaged in would have been too much in my opinion and further taken away from the beauty that was also there. I grew up on 24th avenue & 31st street. And yes, Perrys was across the street but our budget couldn't handle recreating it. Glad to see some of you enjoyed it and maybe it brought back some memories of a magical time & place.

Offline AlexNYC

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Re: Accuracy of "A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints"?
« Reply #19 on: December 20, 2016, 09:21:17 PM »
Nice to hear from you Dito. I agree, how gritty or violent cliques of friends are or are not varies from block to block and period to period. Astoria and many neighborhoods of NYC were a good place to grow up from the 1940s through perhaps the 1990s. Kids would spend the vast majority of their time after school and days off with other friends. Today kids don't hang out outside that much anymore. It's a different world.

By the way your upcoming film, The Clapper, is getting a lot of positive buzz. I wish you much success.

Offline astoriagirl

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Re: Accuracy of "A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints"?
« Reply #20 on: December 26, 2016, 09:41:45 AM »
That movie was ridiculous in terms of accuracy - Astoria was never that tough.  I hated that movie for that reason.  I wondered "what" Astoria they were depicting - - certainly not the place I grew up.

Offline Eamonn

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Re: Accuracy of "A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints"?
« Reply #21 on: December 27, 2016, 12:50:19 PM »
That movie was ridiculous in terms of accuracy - Astoria was never that tough.  I hated that movie for that reason.  I wondered "what" Astoria they were depicting - - certainly not the place I grew up.
I didn't grow up in Astoria but I can tell you that in the Bronx, Astoria definitely had the reputation as a nice neighborhood. Has been the case for many years.

Offline dito

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Re: Accuracy of "A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints"?
« Reply #22 on: March 03, 2017, 10:55:04 PM »
of the 7 kids the book talks about in Astoria 2 were murdered. 1 by one of our mutual friend also in the book. 3 are deported. if your street was quaint good for you. Mine was beautiful and I loved growing up there and a lot of people i knew went on to do great things and have families etc. but my immediate friends were not that lucky.



 

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