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Author Topic: Photo buffs  (Read 8402 times)

vcapetanos

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Photo buffs
« on: August 21, 2006, 04:28:45 PM »
Forgive me, it's monday and i'm stuck on stupid. It's been about 10 yrs since I have processed my own b+w film, but I have recently decided to start getting back into photography. (Like most ppl, I took b+w in school). I never payed (or is it paid?) close attention to it when I was in school so I was hoping someone here could tell me what the processing differences are. I am familar with b+w, but have no clue about color.

I've started to gather up darkroom supplies, but was curious to know if you can process color film at home too?

Thx,
V.

ZiP!

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Re: Photo buffs
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2006, 05:26:18 PM »
I've been shooting only digital recently - but I think it's super expensive to process + make prints of color stuff in the darkroom.  I could be mistaken though.

ZiP!

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Re: Photo buffs
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2006, 05:53:13 PM »
I think it requires lots more chemicals.

Quote
Minilabs have taken the fun (if there ever was any) out of color printing. If you only shoot in color, it may make more sense to find a reliable lab and let them do the hard work. But Black-and-white is a different story. Black and white, because of its relative ease of processing, is easier to control; as a result, many darkroom enthusiasts are able to make interpretive prints that say more than any machine print can say.

taken from here: http://www.photogs.com/bwworld/bwdarkrm1.html

Offline Harlan

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Re: Photo buffs
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2006, 06:09:35 PM »
And I think you have to precisely control temperature of the water bath too...

Incidentally, for B&W, with a digital camera, you can take a color photo then in Picasa/iPhoto/photoshop you can desaturate the color. At least in Picasa, you can pretend you took the photo with any number of filters, which changes the effect a lot. This is a much better thing to do then to set your camera to B&W mode... Here's one of mine I did that with:


vcapetanos

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Re: Photo buffs
« Reply #4 on: August 21, 2006, 06:17:31 PM »

vcapetanos

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Re: Photo buffs
« Reply #5 on: August 21, 2006, 06:20:36 PM »
And I think you have to precisely control temperature of the water bath too...

Incidentally, for B&W, with a digital camera, you can take a color photo then in Picasa/iPhoto/photoshop you can desaturate the color. At least in Picasa, you can pretend you took the photo with any number of filters, which changes the effect a lot. This is a much better thing to do then to set your camera to B&W mode... Here's one of mine I did that with:



To be honest, I have never used any imaging program(s) with any of my digital photos. I don't have the patience or know how for them - mainly the latter.

Teach me, obi wan?

vcapetanos

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Re: Photo buffs
« Reply #6 on: August 21, 2006, 06:23:05 PM »
I think that the photo ppl around here should get together, share our fav photos (and techniques) and what not - but that's just my $.02.

Offline Harlan

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Re: Photo buffs
« Reply #7 on: August 21, 2006, 06:50:19 PM »
To be honest, I have never used any imaging program(s) with any of my digital photos. I don't have the patience or know how for them - mainly the latter.

Teach me, obi wan?

Listen well, Grasshopperanos...

Do you have a Mac or a PC? I don't know the Mac software, but I understand that iPhoto's pretty good. For a PC, run do not walk to http://picasa.google.com/ and download a copy of Picasa. It's an easy piece of software to use just as soon as you figure out how the photo library works. Basically, you "import" photo images into the program, then categorize them with tags and labels and things. Forget about "folders", those are the old way of organizing things! Search is the new way. Also, Picasa stores all sorts of information about the files (tags, edits), and lets you see the results, but doesn't actually ever physically change the underlying photo file. If you want to do something with the file (upload, whatever), you have to export the file to a new image file. It's easy to import files from a camera or memory card.

To do the filtered B&W thing, click on an imported image, go to "Effects", then select "Filtered B&W". Then click "Pick Color" and run your mouse over the colors and see how different each virtual filter is on the final image... Cool, eh?

You can do cool things with Photoshop/Gimp, but these are much more challenging to learn than something like Picasa. For example, I did this in Gimp, keeping the sculpture in color (and tweaking the color a little to make it a richer brown), and desaturating everything else. I do wish I hadn't clipped the right edge of the sculpture when I was taking the picture...!





[attachment deleted by admin]

Offline mirki2

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Re: Photo buffs
« Reply #8 on: August 21, 2006, 07:11:25 PM »
what I love about photoshop is the layering...
seek peace and pursue it.

ZiP!

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Re: Photo buffs
« Reply #9 on: August 21, 2006, 08:08:44 PM »
i could talk photography for days :)

vcapetanos

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Re: Photo buffs
« Reply #10 on: August 22, 2006, 08:37:46 AM »
Listen well, Grasshopperanos...

Do you have a Mac or a PC? I don't know the Mac software, but I understand that iPhoto's pretty good. For a PC, run do not walk to http://picasa.google.com/ and download a copy of Picasa. It's an easy piece of software to use just as soon as you figure out how the photo library works. Basically, you "import" photo images into the program, then categorize them with tags and labels and things. Forget about "folders", those are the old way of organizing things! Search is the new way. Also, Picasa stores all sorts of information about the files (tags, edits), and lets you see the results, but doesn't actually ever physically change the underlying photo file. If you want to do something with the file (upload, whatever), you have to export the file to a new image file. It's easy to import files from a camera or memory card.

To do the filtered B&W thing, click on an imported image, go to "Effects", then select "Filtered B&W". Then click "Pick Color" and run your mouse over the colors and see how different each virtual filter is on the final image... Cool, eh?

You can do cool things with Photoshop/Gimp, but these are much more challenging to learn than something like Picasa. For example, I did this in Gimp, keeping the sculpture in color (and tweaking the color a little to make it a richer brown), and desaturating everything else. I do wish I hadn't clipped the right edge of the sculpture when I was taking the picture...!





I've had picasa for some time now and hardly use it. I mainly use the software that came with my kodak digital for cropping and such. I'll give Picasa a try tonight though and see how I fare. Thanks for the tips!

V.

vcapetanos

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Re: Photo buffs
« Reply #11 on: August 22, 2006, 08:38:38 AM »
i could talk photography for days :)

I'm all ears and sponge.  :-D

Newtownian

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Re: Photo buffs
« Reply #12 on: August 22, 2006, 10:24:48 AM »
I wrote a whole big thing about film vs. digital and it was lost in the crossover..

Summary: hp5+, fp4, tmax, t100 = awesome bw film. Do it at home or at printspace. comes out waaay better than digital desaturated. xp2 super is a film that is developed using color chemical (c41). Very nice. For a purist, not as good as bw film with bw chems.

Color film sucks. Not as clean as digital. You need to keep the chems at a high temp to process correctly. it's even worse if you take it to the 1 hour place

Color Tranparency is nice. e-6 chemicals to develop.. Take to a reputable lab to develop. or use to crossprocess (use c-41) but it will ruin everyone elses film if you take it to the 1 hour place.

Go to flickr an look up hp5, fp4, tmax, t100, xp2 super, e6, c41 and cross process.

Offline Harlan

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Re: Photo buffs
« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2006, 10:36:00 AM »
Ah, bummer you lost the post! Looks like it would have been good stuff...

I've used that color-process BW film and got some pretty good photos, but I don't have a film camera any more.

Any tips for those of us who have moved to digital and want to desaturate as best we can? What's the big difference between BW film and desaturated color? Is it the particular wavelengths that BW film is sensitive too (which could be simulated by filters)? Is it the increased contrast (which could be simulated by playing with level curves)?


I wrote a whole big thing about film vs. digital and it was lost in the crossover..

Summary: hp5+, fp4, tmax, t100 = awesome bw film. Do it at home or at printspace. comes out waaay better than digital desaturated. xp2 super is a film that is developed using color chemical (c41). Very nice. For a purist, not as good as bw film with bw chems.

Color film sucks. Not as clean as digital. You need to keep the chems at a high temp to process correctly. it's even worse if you take it to the 1 hour place

Color Tranparency is nice. e-6 chemicals to develop.. Take to a reputable lab to develop. or use to crossprocess (use c-41) but it will ruin everyone elses film if you take it to the 1 hour place.

Go to flickr an look up hp5, fp4, tmax, t100, xp2 super, e6, c41 and cross process.


Offline NYCMacUser

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Re: Photo buffs
« Reply #14 on: August 22, 2006, 10:42:30 AM »
Go to flickr an look up hp5, fp4, tmax, t100, xp2 super, e6, c41 and cross process.
WTF!

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